ChurchOfJesusChristWikia
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Overview[]

The San Antonio Texas Temple was the fourth temple built in Texas, following the Dallas Texas Temple (1984), the Houston Texas Temple (2000), and the Lubbock Texas Temple (2002).

The groundbreaking ceremony for the San Antonio Texas Temple was held on the same day as the groundbreaking ceremony for the Helsinki Finland Temple.


History[]

On September 21, 2004, a 13-foot, gold-leafed statue of the angel Moroni was placed atop the San Antonio Texas Temple, coinciding with the 181st anniversary of the first appearance of Moroni to Joseph Smith.1

During its three-week open house period, the temple saw more than 50,000 visitors enter its doors including missionaries of San Antonio-based Evidence Ministries. Church representatives gave a tour to these missionaries, who stood on the streets every day of the open house distributing thousands of copies of an eight-page tabloid to passing motorists. Despite Ministries' claims that the Church misrepresents its differences with traditional Christianity, the Church interacted peacefully with Ministries' missionaries, even giving them use of its meetinghouse bathrooms.2

The evening before the temple dedication, 20,000 people filled the Alamodome for a cultural celebration, featuring fireworks, horses, and over 4,000 singers and dancers. The various presentations reflected on Texas history, patriotism, the importance of family values, and the story of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In promoting the celebration, producer Gary Bradley noted, "It'll make people proud, and some parts of it will make people cry." Two hours before the musical celebration began, President Gordon B. Hinckley delighted the audience with a speech focused on the temple.3



Temple presidents[]

Notable temple presidents have included:


Temple District[]

SouthCentral Texas (San Antonio)[]

Stakes[]

# LDS # Title Found Date Temple District 1st president Notes Status
001 0626 Austin Texas Stake 14 Oct 1973 San Antonio Amos L. Wright
002 1835 Austin Texas Oak Hills Stake 01 Dec 1991 San Antonio Gary S. Robinson
003 xxxx Austin Texas West Stake 01 Dec 1991 San Antonio Gary S. Robinson
004 xxxx Cedar Park Texas Stake 05 Jun 2016 San Antonio map] n
005 0398 Corpus Christi Texas Stake 31 May 1964 San Antonio Clarence Cottam
006 1247 Harlingen Texas Stake 22 May 1981 San Antonio Leonard Moore
007 0986 Killeen Texas Stake 26 Nov 1978 San Antonio Stephen B. Hutchings
008 2802 Kyle Texas Stake 04 May 2008 San Antonio Charles T. Allen
009 xxxx Laredo Texas Stake 02 Dec 2018 San Antonio map] n
010 0692 McAllen Texas Stake 04 May 1975 San Antonio Daniel B. Larsen
011 2806c McAllen Texas West Stake 07 Sep 2008 San Antonio Lauren B Chandler
012 2531 Round Rock Texas Stake 06 Jun 1999 San Antonio Howard J. Nicholas
013 xxxx Round Rock Texas East Stake 24 Nov 2013 San Antonio map] n
014 0252 San Antonio Texas Stake 19 Jan 1958 San Antonio Roland C. Bremer
015 xxxx San Antonio Texas Cibolo Valley Stake 10 Jan 2016 San Antonio map] n
016 0758 San Antonio Texas East Stake 30 May 1976 San Antonio Archie M. Bruger
017 2791 San Antonio Texas Hill Country Stake 27 Jan 2008 San Antonio Jeffrey D. Foote
018 xxxx San Antonio Texas La Cantera Stake 24 Jan 2016 San Antonio map] n
019 2401 San Antonio Texas North Stake 19 oct 1997 San Antonio Frank J. Dittmar
021 1426 San Antonio Texas West Stake 05 Jun 1983 San Antonio Jan M. Sterneckert
020 San Antonio Texas Pecan Valley Stake 13 Sep 2020 San Antonio

Districts[]

# LDS # Title Found Date Temple District 1st president Notes Status
001 xxxx Eagle Pass Texas District date San Antonio


Access[]

Template:Main article Temple access is available to church members who hold a current temple recommend, as is the case with all operating Latter-day Saints temples. An adjacent visitors center is open to the public. An LDS Church meetinghouse is across the street on the East, which is also open to the public.


See Also[]

References[]


San Antonio Texas Temple[]

Sanantoniotemple2

San Antonio Texas Temple is the fourth temple of the church completed in the state of Texas. The evening before the temple dedication, 20,000 people filled the Alamodome for a cultural celebration, featuring fireworks, horses, and over 4,000 singers and dancers.

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