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Temple History

The Manhattan New York Temple is the 119th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This is the second temple built in New York.

Located at the intersection of West 65th Street, Broadway, and Columbus Avenue, the Manhattan New York Temple stands among some of New York City's most prominent landmarks including Lincoln Center, home of the renowned Juilliard School, and Central Park. The temple proper occupies the top three floors of the edifice while the baptistry operates on the first floor; a meetinghouse spans the third floor, and the second floor houses a public affairs office and distribution center. From the lobby, there is a separate door to enter the temple inscribed Holiness to the Lord.


Temple Facts The Manhattan New York Temple was the second multipurpose temple of the Church, following the Hong Kong China Temple (1996).

The Manhattan New York Temple was the second temple built in the state of New York, following the Palmyra New York Temple(2000).

The Manhattan New York Temple was the third temple built from an existing building, following the Vernal Utah Temple (1997) and the Copenhagen Denmark Temple (2004). The temple is virtually a building within a building, which is completely soundproofed from the hustle and bustle of the City. The original building was a multi-purpose stake center built in 1976.

The cornerstone of the Manhattan New York Temple is located within the multi-purpose building but on an exterior wall of the temple.

The joint announcement of the Boston Massachusetts Temple and the White Plains New York Temple (later called the Harrison New York Temple) replaced the Church's previously announced plans to build a temple in Hartford, Connecticut, to serve both New York and New England.

President Gordon B. Hinckley read from his journal at a member meeting, testifying of the inspiration of the Lord in locating a temple for the New-York-City-area saints in Manhattan, noting that the efforts of the previous six years to build a temple in Harrison, New York, had repeatedly met the strong opposition of neighbors.

Door handles shaped like the Statue of Liberty torch are found throughout the Manhattan New York Temple.

The Manhattan New York Temple received exceptional media coverage, including international coverage, largely due to its location in one of the most influential cities of the world.

The widely publicized public open house of the Manhattan New York Temple was attended by over 53,000 guests.

Temple District

The Manhattan New York Temple serves members from 12 stakes headquartered in Downstate New York and North Jersey:

Downstate New York

  1. Brooklyn New York Stake
  2. Lynbrook New York Stake
  3. New York New York Stake
  4. New York New York YSA Stake
  5. Plainview New York Stake
  6. Westchester New York Stake
  7. Woodside New York Stake
  8. Yorktown New York Stake

North Jersey

  1. Liberty Park New Jersey Stake
  2. Morristown New Jersey Stake
  3. Scotch Plains New Jersey Stake
  4. Soldier Hill New Jersey Stake

Presidents

  1. G. Kem Nixon 2019–
  2. E. Markham Bench 2016–2019
  3. Steven D. Bennion 2013–2016
  4. W. Blair Garff 2010–2013
  5. William J. Frost 2007–2010
  6. John R. Stone 2004–2007

See Also

References


Manhattan New York Temple

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The Manhattan New York Temple is the 119th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This is the second temple built in New York. Located at the intersection of West 65th Street, Broadway, and Columbus Avenue, the Manhattan New York Temple stands among some of New York City's most prominent landmarks including Lincoln Center, home of the renowned Juilliard School, and Central Park. The temple proper occupies the top three floors of the edifice while the baptistry operates on the first floor; a meetinghouse spans the third floor, and the second floor houses a public affairs office and distribution center. From the lobby, there is a separate door to enter the temple inscribed Holiness to the Lord.

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