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Overview

Buffered by an 80-acre nature sanctuary in the northern suburb of Glenview, the Chicago Illinois Temple stands on a lushly wooded site near I-294. The temple is characterized by its six white-tipped spires rising from each corner of the building. The manicured grounds—including two captivating water features—are open for public enjoyment.

The Chicago Illinois Temple is the first of the currently operating temples built in the Midwest and the second latter-day temple built in Illinois, following the original Nauvoo Temple (1846).

The Chicago Illinois Temple is a sister building to the Boise Idaho Temple and the Dallas Texas Temple. The tallest spire of the Chicago Illinois Temple, bearing a gold-leafed statue of the angel Moroni, stands at 112 feet tall.

Temple History

President Gordon B. Hinckley presided at the groundbreaking services for the Chicago Illinois Temple, noting that it was "a day of history." The ceremony marked the beginning of the return of a temple to the state of Illinois. Young women from the St. Paul Minnesota Stake made a dozen dolls for the Chicago Illinois Temple nursery, each named after the girl who made it.

Before the dedication of the Chicago Illinois Temple, approximately 100,065 visitors toured the building during its public open house.

In the dedicatory prayer of the Chicago Illinois Temple, President Gordon B. Hinckley honored the Saints of Nauvoo, who finished construction and dedication of the Nauvoo Temple, even knowing they would be driven out.

1988 Remodel

The Chicago Illinois Temple closed on September 3, 1988, for remodeling that more than doubled its size. The rear central spire and original breezeways between the annex were enclosed, and additional square footage was built underground, largely retaining the exterior appearance of the temple. The remodel added a fifth ordinance room, large sealing room, cafeteria, and maintenance facility. Enlarged were the laundry, administrative area, and baptistry, which was relocated.

In December 1994, the Chicago Illinois Temple was closed for two months for the addition of an elevator and for other minor changes.

2008 Building Flood

On Christmas Eve of 2008, a frozen ceiling sprinkler pipe burst inside the Chicago Illinois Temple, causing extensive water damage. An army of craftsmen from as far away as New Mexico replaced all of the carpet, replaced over 2,000 feet of wood trim, and replaced or reupholstered most of the furniture in just two months.

In January 2015, the smallest sealing room in the Chicago Illinois Temple was converted into a changing room for patrons participating in proxy sealings.


Temple District

The Chicago Illinois Temple serves members from 14 stakes headquartered in Northern Illinois, Wisconsin, Northern Indiana, and Southwestern Michigan:

Northern Illinois

  1. Buffalo Grove Illinois Stake
  2. Chicago Illinois Stake
  3. Joliet Illinois Stake
  4. Naperville Illinois Stake
  5. Rockford Illinois Stake
  6. Schaumburg Illinois Stake
  7. Wilmette Illinois Stake

Wisconsin

  1. Appleton Wisconsin Stake
  2. Green Bay Wisconsin Stake
  3. Madison Wisconsin Stake
  4. Milwaukee Wisconsin North Stake
  5. Milwaukee Wisconsin South Stake

Northern Indiana

  1. Valparaiso Indiana Stake

Southwestern Michigan

  1. Kalamazoo Michigan Stake

Temple Presidents

  1. R. Bruce Duffield 2019–
  2. Sherman L. Doll 2016–2019
  3. Douglas V. Nelson 2013–2016
  4. Paul W. Castleton 2010–2013
  5. Kenneth L. Robinson 2007–2010
  6. Glenn A. Hansen 2004–2007
  7. George H. Watson 2000–2004
  8. Glenn L. Goodwin 1997–2000
  9. Willard B. Barton 1994–1997
  10. Paul W. Wilson 1991–1994
  11. Edwin B. Jones 1988–1991
  12. Lysle R. Cahoon 1985–1988

Access

Temple access is available to church members who hold a current temple recommend, as is the case with all operating Latter-day Saints temples.


See Also

References


Chicago Illinois Temple

Chicagotemple2.jpg

The tallest spire of the Chicago Illinois Temple, bearing a gold-leafed statue of the angel Moroni, stands at 112 feet tall. Buffered by an 80-acre nature sanctuary in the northern suburb of Glenview, it is noted for its six white-tipped spires rising from each corner of the building.

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